VM-UNDERGROUND

Extreme Metal Fanzine est. 2012

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Horrorgraphy – Season of Grief

horrorgraphy – season of grief

When the VM-Underground editor introduced me to the most recent promo list, it was inevitable for me to pay special attention to this band. And how not to do it if a long time ago I did not hear a style as special as this one. The union between Metal and the symphonic is not a new thing. Since the mid-nineties began to appear bands that were enrolled in this way, some new and others who changed their style to this route, as Therion. It was a new sound that refreshed the Metal panorama of that time.

The interesting thing in these bands was the feeling they conveyed, between darkness and mysticism. These characteristics made them fit comfortably among the Doom and Black Metal followers. However, with the pass of time, the style was migrating towards less intense, musically lighter and digestible formulas. For that reason to run into Horrorgraphy is a great thing because, well away from the mainstream, they bet on the darkness of old symphonic metal, in this case something linked to Doom Metal.

This album begins telling clearly what the band is. “In a Dark Time” is a very heavy piece, with harmonisations everywhere and enchanting choral voices, among them that of the soprano Marialena Trikoglou that is fundamental in the whole journey that this album represents. This theme explains very well what we will find later, a composition full of darkness and with stops that down the gloomy sense. “Ghosts” is the next track, much spookier, with a more relevant keyboard and a varied set of voices that include the gutturals of law. “Haunted” is the third song and it turns out to be a very attractive sound experiment, with progressive touches and parts somewhat complicated to define, but which transform the music into a horror tale. “The March of the Dead” is the wildest cut of the disc, with extreme voices in the foreground and a style close to that of Septic Flesh (in reference to melodic Death Metal). However, during the theme they resort again to the “horror story” which satisfies in a great way. “Join Me in Suicice” is a piece that shudder you, with the soprano voice reaching really surprising levels and the keyboard obscuring everything. You can feel that you are sitting in an armchair watching a work in the Grand Guignol, that project that brought the horror to the theatre of Paris in the last decade of the XIX century. The album concludes with “The Rise of Sodom and Gomorrah”, a cover of Therion. In fact, this version made by Horrorgraphy is darker and more provocative.

If you enjoyed old Tristania or The Sins of Thy Beloved, it will be very well received in your collection. (MarioR)