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In Twilight’s Embrace – Lawa

in twilight’s embrace – lawa

Music is widely considered to be a form of art (that’s why there’s music, which is everything that’s listenable, and there’s so called ‘muzak’, which is everything that tries to copy music but fails horrendously. Like the horrible thing played on the speakers when you’re forced to visit a place where all the people you’re not fond of are gathered – like the supermarket) and different forms of art are capable to mix with each other to form something truly magnificent (or fail terribly).

It’s not a new idea to write a music album based on a painting, literary piece, another musical composition or a movie. Album “Lawa” by the ever evolving Polish band In Twilight’s Embrace is a combination of two, dramatic poem ‘Dziady’ by A. Mickiewicz and the movie rendition of that poem titled “Lawa”, which had been released in the tumultous year of 1989. But first, you should meet the band that wrote, performed and recorded the album.

In Twilight’s Embrace started out as a melodeath band in 2003 and released their first full length, “Buried in Between” three years later. During the next five years their sound evolved into Death <etal on their sophomore full length, “Slaves to Martyrdom” and since then their sound ventured into Blackened Death Metal (on my personal favourite by this band, “The Grim Muse”) and finally reaching the most gloomy realms of the atmospheric Black Metal through EP “Trembling” and another full lenght “Vanitas”.

“Lawa” starts out with ritual chanting which builds an almost scary atmosphere, probably the only steady thing on this album. Through six songs we’re taken from almost ambiental, haunting sounds through melodic hooks into the dark, furious Black Metal. The music is layered, passionate and captivating, spiced up with a wide range of vocals (sung entirely in polish) to emphasize the lyrics about belief in the supernatural and death worship – Dziady is actually the pagan ‘Eve of the Forefathers’ which was celebrated twice a year. Throughout centuries, the autumn celebration of this day has turned into the catholic ‘All saints day’, which most slavic people still call ‘The day of the Dead’. (Black Mary)